Paintings By Kumar & Charlot Plomb Chez Bruneau & Co

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The top lot of the sale was this abstract architectural oil painting by Ram Kumar (Indian, 1924-2018), which sold for $21,250 to a collector in Britain. Part of the artist’s ‘Beneras’ series, the work depicts brown buildings against a vibrant blue sky across a river.

Review by WA Demers, Photos from the catalog courtesy of Bruneau & Co

CRANSTON, RI — An online summer auction of antiques and fine art conducted by Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers on August 19 saw 400 lots cross the block. Among them, original oil on canvas paintings by Ram Kumar (Indian, 1924-2018) and Jean Charlot (French, 1898-1979) were the headliners, selling for $21,250 and $20,000 respectively.

Kevin Bruneau, president and owner of the company, said, “The sale brought in just over a quarter of a million with an 85% sale.” A total of 7,442 registered bidders participated across all platforms and phones. From Kumar to Charlot and surprising results for decorative arts objects, there was something for all collectors.

Kumar’s abstract architectural oil had an estimate of $25/35,000. It was sold to a collector in Britain. Part of the artist’s ‘Beneras’ series, the work depicts brown buildings against a vibrant blue sky across a river. Signed and dated “Ram Kumar 07” on the reverse, it measured 36 by 24 inches. “Usually when I look at a landscape, the most interesting aspect of successful ones is a beautiful blue sky, the colors, the palette of light. I think it just jumps,” Bruneau observed.

Described as one of the most prominent abstract painters of modern India, Kumar studied at the Sarada Ukil School of Art in New Delhi before traveling to Paris to study art with André Lhote and Fernand Leger. He is associated with other great artists of the time like MF Hussain, Tyeb Mehta and SH Raza, and abandons figurative subjects to create abstract art. His art commands high prices on the national and international market.

Attained $20,000 against an estimate of $7/10,000, the painting by French artist Jean Charlot (1898-1979) depicting three small, round-faced children wearing glasses and straw hats in a forest world of oval, surrounded by colorful birds, had to do well and it did.  Later in his career, Charlot moved to Hawaii, where he taught at the University of Hawaii.  This painting sold online to a collector there.

Attained $20,000 against an estimate of $7/10,000, the painting by French artist Jean Charlot (1898-1979) depicting three small, round-faced children wearing glasses and straw hats in a forest world of oval, surrounded by colorful birds, had to do well and it did. Later in his career, Charlot moved to Hawaii, where he taught at the University of Hawaii. This painting sold online to a collector there.

“I expected the Charlot to succeed,” Bruneau said of Jean Charlot’s oil painting, a whimsical figurative illustration of three small, round-faced children wearing glasses and straw hats in a oval-shaped forest world, surrounded by colorful birds. . “Despite some damage, it pulled through and exceeded its high estimate.” The work, estimated at $7/10,000, was dedicated, signed and dated (“For HFD, Jean Charlot 1945”) and housed in a 36 by 56 inch frame.

Louis Henri Jean Charlot was a French-born American painter and illustrator, active primarily in Mexico and the United States. After studying at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris and after the First World War, he moved to Mexico, where he became friends with Diego Rivera, David Alfaro Siqueiros and Jose Orozco, imposing himself on the scene. artistic of Mexico. In 1947 he moved his family to Colorado to become director of the school of art at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center. He then moved to Hawaii, where he continued to teach at the University of Hawaii. Unsurprisingly, this painting sold online to a collector in Hawaii.

A fiery sunset over the Hudson River by George Henry Smillie (1840-1921) fetched $5,000. In the 15-inch by 24-inch oil on canvas, the sun is depicted setting over a distant city, bathing fields, and a shimmering lake in warm orange light. Smillie studied art with James McDougal Hart and was a member of the National Academy of Design and the American Watercolor Society. He has been featured in numerous exhibitions, such as the National Academy of Design, Philadelphia Centennial and the Boston Art Club with his works at the Oakland Museum, Metropolitan Museum, Rhode Island School of Design, New York Public Library and many others.

A surprise at the auction was this small 20th century American stubby handle jug with translucent cucumber green glaze.  About 7 by 5¾ inches, it was offered at $7,500, having only been offered with an estimate of $200/300.

A surprise at the auction was this small chunky-handled American jug with a translucent cucumber green glaze. About 7 by 5¾ inches, it was offered at $7,500, having only been offered with an estimate of $200/300.

The sale offered more paintings, decorative arts, furniture, jewelry, silver, Asian arts and collectibles, drawn from leading estates and collections across New England. Bruneau said he usually stages fine art at the start. “We usually always start with fine art,” Bruneau explained. “I’ve been doing this for years, and I just think it’s a way to keep things organized because people who are looking for fine art but not decorative art can do it early.”

There were at least two notable surprises in this sale, both in the decorative arts category. Estimated at just $200/300, a chunky-handled American jug with translucent cucumber green glaze, approximately 7 inches by 5¾ inches, was offered for $7,500. “The market is still there, isn’t it?” Bruneau said. He came out of an estate in North Stonington, Connecticut. Bruneau said, “I was in the house with the family and I said, ‘Oh my God, look at that potty. You should put it up for sale. It ended up affecting a lot of people. “We had four different bidders and a lot of online action,” the auctioneer said.

“I love this plate,” Bruneau said of another small item that fetched a big prize. It was a 19th century Japanese Imperial Satsuma plate, 8 7/8 inches in diameter, which bidders reduced from an expectation of $400/$600 to $7,500. From the collection of an ornately decorated Portsmouth, RI estate, the plate depicted a bustling market scene with a grove of cherry blossoms. Its exterior was decorated with butterflies, dragonflies, beetles and cicadas. “When we saw this plate, I said, ‘guys, I think you have a winner here. The Japanese market can go up and down, never been able to pin it down in the past 10 to 15 last few years, but we offered it at a low price, did a little social media marketing and got a great result.

Rounding out the featured lots in the sale, a Rolex Oyster Perpetual SS and 18k gold men’s watch left the gallery at $5,938; a 20th-century Lalique colorless glass sculpture of a horse’s head with a black circular base fetched $5,313; and a Heriz Geometric Oriental Rug from the Middle East went for $4,063. With a red, yellow, navy blue, pale blue and cream center medallion on a red geometric field surrounded by geometric floral borders, it measured approximately 12 feet by 9 feet 8 inches. When asked if it’s true that geometric patterns are fashionable, floral patterns aren’t, observed Bruneau, “100 percent.” Tribal rugs, Kazaks, flat weaves – what I call sticky flowers – all of these sell very well. The rug had some edge and end wear, shedding on the outer edges, some wear and shedding to the pile and would benefit from cleaning, “But people like them a little beaten up today”, Bruneau said.

The prices shown include the buyer’s commission as quoted by the auction house. Next up for Bruneau & Co. is an estate sale on September 20, an online auction of toys and comics on September 25, military and historical items on November 20, and a sports memorabilia sale in the fall. , date to come. For information, 401-533-9980 or www.bruneauandco.com.

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